How to Market Through the Outside Noise

How to Market Through the Outside Noise

As I sit here in the coffee shop trying to answer e-mails and get work done, I constantly find myself distracted. I am distracted by the table next to me discussing the issues of military intelligence and the corruption of the government in todays global community. The more they talk, the louder and more animated they become. I am distracted by the lady cleaning tables and running back and forth, just doing her job. The gentleman across the room is talking on the phone as if he were in a boardroom. I am even distracted by the constant stream of people walking in and out of the door. I look around and ask myself, how do I get my work done with my concentration constantly interrupted?

Then my mind wondered over to the question of, how do we market in a society filled with competing messages, and more distractions on a daily basis? I realized that we market to the consumer who is consistently distracted. We pass our message along to those not even looking for it at that moment. So how do we stand out through the noise?

The way to break through noise is by not trying to break through the noise, it is to embrace the noise. Too many times, brands try to push as much information about the product into :30 seconds. People today do not respond to marketing messages as they did a few years ago. Technology and society have evolved exponentially, yet we operate our marketing, and even our business operations, with antiquated approaches.

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We are no longer advertisers; we are what I like to call message-based entertainers. People today flock to videos of dogs with human voices reading their minds. We share videos of Batdad, a dad with a Batman mask talking like a superhero. Late Night host Jimmy Fallon gets global attention for his social media trends. People today are not very different from a few years ago. Nobody wants to be advertised to, except maybe the Super Bowl, people want to be entertained.

I recently read an interview with Progressive Insurance’s  CMO, Jennifer Rooney, on Forbes.com about their approach to marketing. In this article, Jeff Charney talks about the approach they take. They look at the work they do by treating the campaign as a sitcom. They have changed the approach by eliminating traditional marketing words, such as commercial, and now calls them episodes. You see, Jeff Charney realized what the consumer has been trying to tell advertisers for years, “We don’t want to be advertised to, we want to be entertained.” That is why people tune into the Super Bowl. Because these advertisers spend more on the production of these commercials and the message then some small budget movies.

You want to break through the noise, stop becoming the noise and start entertaining and make the consumer listen and pay attention. Most importantly, make the consumer start sharing your entertainment. You can effectively market your product and entertain your potential customers without high production budgets and without spending a lot in media cost. You just have to be willing to be creative and let the creativity speak for itself.

About author

Brian Wink

With an extensive background in advertising and the local market, Brian brings a solid blend of traditional marketing expertise and new media knowledge to create a tradigital mindset.

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